Raptor Ray

Raptor Ray, “self-published via KDP”, copyright and written multi-genre e-book by Brent Reilly.

Plot/Characters: The year is 2025 and the beautiful wife of brilliant geneticist Dr. Ramundo Ramirez, is having a designer baby at 6 months because she looked like a huge 9 months and the fetus had begun pushing for delivery. The mother, a 7’ tall, also brilliant geneticist was a genetically enhanced woman herself and had insisted that she give birth to a dinosaur hybrid. Her desires were fulfilled. Sonograms had pictured the fetus as really weird and the obstetrician Bennet had delivered thousands of babies but admittedly this was the first delivery of a non-homo sapiens in 30,000 years. He does a C-section, an extraordinarily large baby explodes out. It has a tail but no feathers or body hair, strange yellow eyes, two claws and a thumb for each hand, scaly skin, and feet presenting three talons only, like an eagle. The delivery causes unstoppable bleeding and she dies. Ramiraz suddenly realizes that she had been more interested in producing this hybrid than in raising it. He is devastated, wants nothing to do with the child. Bennet’s daughter Emily, also attending, cleans the baby but cannot stop its crying. His irascible mother Wilda sees the baby and the two equate immediately. She tells son and Emily to go back to playing God, she would stop teaching and although suffering from Parkinson’s, will take care of this child who had special needs.

The story then turns to the General, the character around whose activity most of the story revolves and with whom (and/or his relatives/offspring) the reader is taken into a long ride through sci-fi accomplishments some of which no doubt already are on the drawing board while others still are on a list of anticipated conjecture. Included are his ability to generate clean electricity, provide potable water putting desalination plants out of business, and transmit it all to where people live, and more. The Pacific Ocean had a million uninhabited islands because of lack of reliable drinking water. He took over, developed them and gathered them together as a country which he owned. He developed a thermal nuclear source far better than electrolysis – placed them as artificial islands calling them ‘sea cities’. These were defenseless until the Jacksons got their own country, claimed an exclusion zone and confiscated ships that fished there. He developed a metal stronger and lighter than steel enabling him to construct the tallest skyscrapers etc. etc. and Luxury resorts cheaper than any. Pre-planned cities with cheapest transportation, education, healthcare, maximized walkability. His family, brilliant geneticists, ran the designer baby clinics that already had produced some of these dominating science, sports, acting, medicine and others who now were in their 20’s. A utopia? Possibly, but this all is dependent upon the General who might be summarily described as often rude, crude, lewd and despicable in his personal as well as business tactics but make make him the first certified Trillionaire. The tactics include manipulative banking activity, short-trading, invoking discontent, riots and more. He ruins Australia, and thousands of parties attempting to stop him collectively lost trillions. He shorted publically-traded counterparties, Goldman Sachs stocks crashed as well as others and he made a trillion just on shorting thousands of financial firms and used the media to inflame Americans so they wouldn’t fund necessary defense/attack needs so he could take over.

Discussion: The author has presented a lengthy treatise on the physical troubles facing today’s world and its inhabitants with additional ways in which these problems could be eliminated mostly, unfortunately by means not yet available. The activities additionally mirror much of the subversive activity that is so apparent in political maneuvering on the international level. This definitely is a book that should appeal to sci-fi/fantasy/thriller devotees. This reviewer’s personal enjoyment would have been much enhanced if some of the descriptions of building the various cities and those of the frequent battles could have been edited sufficiently as to be less redundant. i.e. although admittedly varied, much redundancy could have been eliminated. One other curious note – given the apparent importance of Raptor Ray’s birth, it seems, at least to this reviewer, odd that only the occasional chapter was devoted to his activities until close to the book’s end.

3* Basically sci-fi, multi-genre story exploring numerous modern world problems.

 

Panther Across the Stars

Panther Across the Star, Fallen Leaf Books, e-book copyright and written by Lon Brett Coon.

Prologue: In a broken down house in Oklahoma in the year 2023 Myaka is at the height of frustration. He is the great grandson of the long line of Panther Across the Sky, Chief of the Shawnee Indian tribe. As hereditary leader, he is afraid for his people: “How many times can a peoples’ hope be torn from them before it goes out forever? I don’t know if I can bear that burden. It crushes my bones and chains my soul.” He is a desperate soul who drowned in a river of fear. He smashes the mirror with his fists as well as any other glass wear available. His mother tells him all eventually will be alright but too immersed within himself, he grabs a blanket against the chill and wanders out into the night. He encounters a group of people sharing fun, wine and talk around a campfire on the beach. They invite him over, are a little startled because easy relationships are difficult between people of their culture and his. However, they equate well and upon their urging he tells them a story. The tale is based fundamentally on the life of the purportedly wise Shawnee Indian chief Tecumseh and his attempts to form a confederacy of Indian nations to stop the encroaching white man. He is presented as a man who wanted peace for all with none overriding others in spite of seeing his father brutally killed by white men who had invaded Shawnee territory. The tale continues with numerous episodes of his life, some based on actual activities, others are conjecture including his saving the lives of three intergalactic persons who crash in their spaceship near his band of warriors – an incident purportedly to be found in Shawnee legend. This volume of the anticipated series ends with an epic white/Redman battle. An epilogue follows where Myaka finishes his story to the uneasy group of the rape of the Indian nations by the constantly encroaching white men with their incessant lies, retractions and overwhelming military resources and concludes: “The Reservation – a token gift to the savages that holds up American humanity.” He walks away, but the reader is given to understand that somehow with this catharsis, the fifteen year old boy has grown to become a man and the reader understands that the saga is about to continue.

Discussion: The author has provided a historical novel with a message somewhat similar to the earlier written books describing the fall of the Cherokee Nation but with an interesting sci-fi addition. The body of the tale is well-written, the action is abundant and graphically detailed and follows the life of the Shawnee Chief Tecumseh with a slight historical error, unnoticeable to other than a very few American Indian aficionados. From the viewpoint of a reader who has spent a fair amount of time in and around reservations, the housing description and Myaka’s actions are particularly well done. The epilogue does not seem to fit as well. It somehow seems to this reviewer like a prepared paper to enforce a point that already has been well presented in the body of story. (An aside perhaps of some interest to a few readers –the name Myaka means Turtle.)

4* Enjoyable historical with an interesting sci-fi inclusion.