Just Juliet

Just Juliet, published by Inkitt, the Hipster’s Library, an e-book by Charlotte Reagan.

Plot: The story line simply follows a group of young people as they move through their lives and relationships during their high school years with eventual dispersal to various colleges and slightly beyond. The actual school time activities are presented quite superficially with more prominent concentration on those of a social or inter-relational nature. The reason unfolds quite quickly when the reader discovers that the main theme is to follow the evolution of the main protagonist, Lena, into an individual with active bi-/homosexuality. The story examines the feelings and activities of this individual as she becomes entangled with a young woman, Juliet, who has a most unusual and understanding family. It details the evolving relationship with her, Juliet’s family, Lena’s own family and with her heterosexual friends and acquaintances and progresses to build ultimately to a most interesting conclusion.

Discussion: The author has provided, perhaps somewhat surprisingly in fictional form, a rather thoughtful and seemingly knowledgeable account of a period of transition faced by an individual who cannot feel happy in the conventional male/female relationship. It presents the fears, anxieties, extensive soul-searching and embarrassments encountered in the often lengthy, lonely and always highly distressful trip in order hopefully, to attain periods of mental/physical satisfaction, a sense of belonging and ‘true love’. Unfortunately, it mentions only minimally the down side of the often highly discriminatory activity such individuals still encounter.

3* 4*Well-written partial primer on bi-/homosexuality; 3* or less if not interested.

 

Black’s Beach Parallax

Black’s Beach Parallax
ISBN: 9780692224311, an e-book thriller including numerous long contentiously debated occurrences of the 1960’s and following years by Scott Spade.

Plot: A prologue speaks of a package from Jack O’Malley addressed to his grandson and not to be opened until after his death. The story then proceeds to follow Jack’s life. It begins with his first job as a fresh UCLA graduate at Astro Dynamics, a company working under government contract; follows with his dismissal with downsizing ordered by McNamara; activity at making a living as a professional gambler with his discovered ability to read cards and gamble (in San Diego where small mom/pop gambling houses limited to a few tables of “games of skill’ of insufficient interest to attract the Mafia and their larger Las Vegas ‘games of chance’); to receipt of an offer from Gene, a brilliant former co-worker who has taken a position with an ultra-secrete ‘Think Tank’- the offer is too good to decline but requires clandestine activity that includes deposition of information in a far-removed hidden place; additional activity as a real estate investor and ultimately as a dealer in futures. Abundant, well-described ‘hippie’ and subsequent other sub-culture activity of the era is included and the story moves at a good pace, especially considering the amount of information that is included.

Discussion: The author has provided a most interesting story that should have appeal on two levels. First, a story depicting a period within the United States of tremendous upheaval and change viewed largely from the activity of one ‘largely committed’ active participant of the era. Specifically: “…embracement of the counterculture revolution in social norms of clothing, music drugs, dress and sex. Eclectic psychologists, antiwar activists, sexual-freedom advocates, new agers, draft dodgers, college professors, discussions ranging from intelligent interchanges to new-age gibberish.” Second, a most provocative re-counting and re-examination of the involvement of prominent governmental personnel and agencies in many of the controversial happenings of the times – Vietnam War, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, Kennedy’s assignation, Nixon activities, aspects of the Cold War, Cuba, Batista and Castro, others.

Conclusion: Fascinating, not documented perhaps, but at least tantalizingly provocative circumstantial evidence of FBI, CIA and even higher elected/appointed governmental official involvement in nefarious clandestine activity. The author has enclosed this material in an easy reading tale of an intelligent young college graduate as he ‘goes with the flow’ of the somewhat tumultuous era of the 1960’s and beyond. It is particularly intriguing to the reader interested in, and conversant with the tales set forth daily by the media with respect to political maneuvering and the myriad suggestions of malfeasance and innumerable other improper activities extant today.

5* Excellent conjecture on governmental malfeasance enclosed in enjoyable tale of another era.