Unlocking the Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities; An autobiographical Expose

 

Unlocking The Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities, An Autobiographical Exposé ISBN: 9781524599584, Xlibris Rev. Date 07/06/2018, by Salar A. Khan, MD, MBA.

The book contains a Disclaimer followed by a list of 2018 Book Awards, some Book Reviews, a Preface and Introduction and eight chapters. Chapter 1 sets forth details of family background and of his parents’ role in his leadership development, their healthy approach to parenting and the importance of storytelling in providing a path toward formation of “healthy kids”. Chapter 2 presents “Teaching of Natural-Born (NBL) Abilities, Traits” which he divides into three phases – Infant to Childhood (Ages 1–11); Adolescence to Middle Fifties (Ages 12–49); Mature Adulthood Ages Fifty Onward (Ages 50-Onward). The 3rd offers “Could I be a Natural-Born Leader?” followed by discussion of such somewhat disparate subjects as “NBL Desire Built inside the Heart, Not as a Learned Trait; Employees Dissatisfied with Managers or Bosses; Changing Trend of Leadership Role; Difference in the NBL Abilities: International and National Level.” Chapter 4 describes the advancement of his foundation and development of Leadership abilities and intuition in clinical, research and managerial positions of gradually increasing importance. 5 returns to a discussion on Leadership and why he believes he is a NBL. 6 presents a discussion about the “Cultivation of My Natural-Born Leader Qualities” and of the qualities required to reach such a position. 7 provides further discussion of intuition and the importance of this element in leadership. Chapter 8 is a “Conclusion and Self-Assessment Tool to Identfy NBL Abilities.” The book concludes with “Awards and Honors.”

Discussion: An evaluation of this book, in this reviewer’s opinion, only can be done rather dichotomously. First of all, the author comes originally from the rather heavily conflicted Pakistan, where he received his medical training and practiced, as well as in Saudi Arabia’s more prestigious hospital system. His decision to come to the U.S. was to provide his children with a less dangerous life outlook. He sacrificed considerably to do so but believed that, with the teachings he had obtained from a magnificently supportive family, all would be for the best. His autobiography appears to indicate that he has moved steadily forward to lead a most exemplary life filled with development of a most notable array of the more important factors in life, apparently resulting often in acts of true altruism. Further, he has discovered that the incorporation of these factors provide a person with a most pleasant sense of satisfaction. Unlike today’s seemingly most dominant tendency to do as little as possible to gain the highest monetary reward, one should “accept challenges and perform additional projects without expecting any reward.” The book must be read to understand the principles the man has set forth as the most satisfactory way of life. From this perspective, this is a most inspirational read.

Regrettably however, from this reviewer’s perspective, the author has not clearly verbalized his intent when speaking of Natural-Born versus learned abilities, viz. Chapter 2 Titled (and discussed) “Teaching of Natural-Born (NBL) Abilities, Traits” along with his emphasis (and repetition throughout the book) on the thoughtful and effective methods employed by his parents while he was a growing child to teach him the qualities that lead to effective leadership. More specifically, the author appears to be attempting to provide an understanding of the necessity for a person to recognize the lessons provided in life, to understand them, and to properly incorporate them into his armentarium to attain a leadership role within which he/she then is most comfortable. Also from a literary viewpoint, there is a considerable amount of repetition in the prose and a certain ‘rambling’ quality to the presentation. Most assuredly the fact that English is not the author’s main language is a prominent factor in this presentation. However, the message he has sincerely attempted to project would greatly benefit from judicious editing.

Conclusion: A most inspirational book that regrettably portrays some confusion in basic tenets and unfortunate literary glitches no doubt resulting from English not being the author’s first language.

3* 5* Highly inspirational; 3 basic tenet, literary, glitches from language unfamiliarity.

 

 

 

 

The Executive Marriage Solution

The Executive Marriage Solution ISBN: 9781732503236, Robbins Flight Press, Copyright by Robbins & the author, Dr. Lisa M. Webb.

Subtitled “Transforming Boardroom Success Into Bedroom Bliss”, the author’s method is presented here in 3 Parts. Part 1 describes “The Journey: Looking Back and Moving Forward”. Part 2 discusses “The Decision: Planning for s Better Future”. Part 3 presents “The Destination: Sparking Conscious Transformation”. Each part is subdivided into sections/chapters describing and discussing the facts pertinent to the part exactly as described with Part 3 actually providing an ‘overall’ look at the emerging transformation. A list of sixty-three pertinent references are included along with the usual Dedication, Acknowledgements and provision of the author’s unique credits that support her abilities to legitimately provide such instruction.

Discussion/Conclusion: The theme of the book is to emphasize the fact that to retain a successful marital relationship, the same approach must be used as in business. That “If you refuse to buy into the idea that marriage is work, then you will be sadly disappointed.” Most executives are accustomed to directing matters as they see them and brook little if any deviation from what they believe to be best. Marriage is not in any way similar. It is a matter of ‘give and take’. Control of finances, social life, sex, housework, children all are matters that must be shared in one manner or another. Too often executives become confrontational in a situation that calls for understanding and communication. And more frequently than not, people do not understand that communication is more than ‘listening while formulating what you are going to say next’. A person must HEAR what the other individual is saying. Most frequently this may be accomplished by listening more than you talk. It also requires truthful, often painful, introspection. Numerous case histories are presented for emphasis. There is some redundancy but overall is a book from which many executives well may benefit.

5* For targeted audience.