Raptor Ray

Raptor Ray, “self-published via KDP”, copyright and written multi-genre e-book by Brent Reilly.

Plot/Characters: The year is 2025 and the beautiful wife of brilliant geneticist Dr. Ramundo Ramirez, is having a designer baby at 6 months because she looked like a huge 9 months and the fetus had begun pushing for delivery. The mother, a 7’ tall, also brilliant geneticist was a genetically enhanced woman herself and had insisted that she give birth to a dinosaur hybrid. Her desires were fulfilled. Sonograms had pictured the fetus as really weird and the obstetrician Bennet had delivered thousands of babies but admittedly this was the first delivery of a non-homo sapiens in 30,000 years. He does a C-section, an extraordinarily large baby explodes out. It has a tail but no feathers or body hair, strange yellow eyes, two claws and a thumb for each hand, scaly skin, and feet presenting three talons only, like an eagle. The delivery causes unstoppable bleeding and she dies. Ramiraz suddenly realizes that she had been more interested in producing this hybrid than in raising it. He is devastated, wants nothing to do with the child. Bennet’s daughter Emily, also attending, cleans the baby but cannot stop its crying. His irascible mother Wilda sees the baby and the two equate immediately. She tells son and Emily to go back to playing God, she would stop teaching and although suffering from Parkinson’s, will take care of this child who had special needs.

The story then turns to the General, the character around whose activity most of the story revolves and with whom (and/or his relatives/offspring) the reader is taken into a long ride through sci-fi accomplishments some of which no doubt already are on the drawing board while others still are on a list of anticipated conjecture. Included are his ability to generate clean electricity, provide potable water putting desalination plants out of business, and transmit it all to where people live, and more. The Pacific Ocean had a million uninhabited islands because of lack of reliable drinking water. He took over, developed them and gathered them together as a country which he owned. He developed a thermal nuclear source far better than electrolysis – placed them as artificial islands calling them ‘sea cities’. These were defenseless until the Jacksons got their own country, claimed an exclusion zone and confiscated ships that fished there. He developed a metal stronger and lighter than steel enabling him to construct the tallest skyscrapers etc. etc. and Luxury resorts cheaper than any. Pre-planned cities with cheapest transportation, education, healthcare, maximized walkability. His family, brilliant geneticists, ran the designer baby clinics that already had produced some of these dominating science, sports, acting, medicine and others who now were in their 20’s. A utopia? Possibly, but this all is dependent upon the General who might be summarily described as often rude, crude, lewd and despicable in his personal as well as business tactics but make make him the first certified Trillionaire. The tactics include manipulative banking activity, short-trading, invoking discontent, riots and more. He ruins Australia, and thousands of parties attempting to stop him collectively lost trillions. He shorted publically-traded counterparties, Goldman Sachs stocks crashed as well as others and he made a trillion just on shorting thousands of financial firms and used the media to inflame Americans so they wouldn’t fund necessary defense/attack needs so he could take over.

Discussion: The author has presented a lengthy treatise on the physical troubles facing today’s world and its inhabitants with additional ways in which these problems could be eliminated mostly, unfortunately by means not yet available. The activities additionally mirror much of the subversive activity that is so apparent in political maneuvering on the international level. This definitely is a book that should appeal to sci-fi/fantasy/thriller devotees. This reviewer’s personal enjoyment would have been much enhanced if some of the descriptions of building the various cities and those of the frequent battles could have been edited sufficiently as to be less redundant. i.e. although admittedly varied, much redundancy could have been eliminated. One other curious note – given the apparent importance of Raptor Ray’s birth, it seems, at least to this reviewer, odd that only the occasional chapter was devoted to his activities until close to the book’s end.

3* Basically sci-fi, multi-genre story exploring numerous modern world problems.

 

The One Things

The One Things ISBN: 9781545621875, Xulon Press copyright and written by Dr, C. Todd Fetter.

Grandpa Ed was a charming old man who every morning during the school year arose early and walked to the school crossing to greet the children. Every afternoon on the way home they would stop by his house to hear the endless stories he had to tell. He never had married or had children of his own. Instead, he had dedicated his life to helping orphaned children around the world. One day word spread that Grandpa Ed was in the hospital. Emma persuaded her mother to take her and a few friends – James, Sophia, Max and Noah – to visit him in the hospital where, once again, he was able to fully engage them by telling stories. This time it was to teach them lessons by having them participate by using their hands and attaching the significant aspect of the story to a particular finger selected on one of the hands of each child. The stories were based on selections from the Bible that illustrated the points being made. Finally he recapped the stories with the children with the emphasis resulting in the children ultimately understanding the importance of studying hard, learning to live a good life and to know God, with hopefully a hint furnished by those five fingers, if necessary.

Discussion: A children’s book well-written and illustrated to provide in a most child-friendly manner lessons on living with emphasis on religious tenets. The author, apparently closely associated with the Evangelistic ministry, appears to have been able to present these sessions with children in a smooth, natural manner. This is a difficult task, not easily accomplished by most writers. Thus, Dr. Fetter’s book should be well-accepted and thoroughly enjoyed especially by children being raised in the Christian Faith.

5* Children’s book especially enjoyable for those in the Christian Faith.