The Birth of Malgyron

The Birth of Malgyron, an e-book published by Crossroad Press and the second in a projected series of four books by John deFilippis.

Plot: In the series initial book the aging and in poor health King of Manivor sends a select group of thirteen men to recover a lost Medallion of far greater intrinsic value than its mere monetary worth. It is foundand the individual actually discovering it becomes the new King. It is not a popular decision among some of his associates, the General of Manivor’s Army and a few others. As the story continues in this present volume, the King is a most forgiving individual, even attempting to stop the long-standing and incessant warfare with their mortal enemy, the nearby country of Xamnon. He succeeds, the reader discovers that he actually is the “only son of The Author” who is the ruling deity of the world, and his acts of forgiveness and other decisions for ‘the good of all’ are used maliciously against him. He is deposed, sentenced by the tribunals, and the evil Malgyron is born plunging the world into a burgeoning period of darkness. The manner in which these changes are produced, how they contained in this volume.affect many of the same characters with whom the reader has gained empathy and what these changes portend for the content of future books in the series provide the interesting material

Discussion: To provide an adequate discussion for this book, I must refer in part to my discussion of Volume One. Specifically, the composition of the novel was most interesting because of its seemingly unusual origin – an author who was a onetime religious novice but transitioned to education and/or religious academic administration. He always had ‘loved writing’ and as a child preferred tales containing epic quests embarked upon by courageous warriors who were required to deal with “fierce monsters”. With time now available, he began the projected series and produced a book that “follows exactly these desires with an underlying religious thread that does not intrude, but perhaps rather enhances the overall theme”. To discuss the present volume, a CAVEAT must be provided. This present volume continues exactly to follow the author’s desires BUT with an increased emphasis on the underlying religious theme by proceeding to follow much of Jesus’ final activities in life. The King is vilified for bypassing the tribunals by a kind gesture to a prostitute, has a last dinner with his guards, makes a trip to the Garden (obviously Gethsemane) and is put through a slightly altered sequence of final activity. Thus, many readers may feel that in this volume, the religious thread that formerly “does not intrude, but perhaps rather enhances the overall theme” has transcended the ‘good versus evil’ fantasy ‘thread’ to one more akin to a truly religious story. The presentation further seems to have acquired a more simplistic direction that would appear to project it toward a somewhat younger group of readers although the basic plot, characters and descriptions fundamentally still may be such as to provide appeal generally to fantasy devotees.

3* for fantasy devotees and possibly other ‘escapists’; caveat required.

 

Never Alone

Never Alone
ISBN: 9781683482932, Page Publishing, an e-book by Kara Lumbley.

Plot: Jena, ME for Savannah, GA. and her close friend, lead detective Jordan (female) leave for a trip to the shore after intense activity following recent serial killings that left women gutted and abandoned in warehouses. Actually, she had been another one of the women, only was rescued in time. The killer had not acted again for a period of time leading them to the belief that he may have left the area. They spend a quiet time in a beach house in S. Carolina near Hilton Head and it is only when they are ready to leave that Jordan discovers foot prints outside of where Jenna had been sleeping. She does not inform her because she didn’t want her to be worried. Meanwhile, Jordan’s partner Michael is called by Lt. Vane to investigate a case where an older man is discovered dead just off a popular park trail. He, along with a department newbie, begin the investigation and discover he had been killed elsewhere and deposited along the trail; that he is Arthur Reddings, an apparently wealthy 61-year-old originally from a small GA town; he has an adopted daughter Anne whom he provides for in a rather open-handed manner even after a rather vitriolic divorce from the girl’s mother; that he sends $10,000 monthly to Eastern Cape, South Africa; that he makes frequent trips to Africa and seems to have other strange attributes/activities. The story proceeds to follow a fascinating course as the reader gradually discovers increasingly interesting facts about Arthur’s multi-tasked life along with closely associated activity by the employees of the Savannah and other legal departments, to most of whom the reader already have been introduced. And the story’s finale provides a perfect entry to the next anticipated volume.

Discussion: If you are a reader who enjoys a pleasant story fancifully and charmingly presented in a fast-moving fashion, this story is for you. Buy, read and enjoy but DO NOT reads beyond this point UNLESS you are a devotee of more traditional mysteries.

SPOILER ALERT! Regrettably, the case so pleasantly but rather cavalierly presented by the author would not be the simple matter described. A U.S. Citizen is murdered in a U.S. State city within the jurisdiction of the local police. However, ties are discovered that lead to a foreign country and include the victim being a member of the FBI involved in clandestine activity in a foreign country – an activity that more usually would be the concern of the CIA and INTERPOL (The FBI does maintain some offices overseas but more probably would only tangentially be involved in an incident as described.) Additionally, the level of activity described by the local Savannah authorities is difficult to accept as well as description of the range of Arthur’s dispersal of government money. His cache of weapons also does not seem to have any logical reason.

Conclusion: An interestingly plotted story fancifully and charmingly presented, but not for most usual mystery devotees.

3* Interesting plot, fascinatingly, charmingly presented; not for usual mystery devotee.