The Bestowing Sun

The Bestowing Sun

ISBN: 9781780363059, Peach Publishing, an e-book by Neil Grimmett.

Plot/Characters: This is a story set in a small village and surrounding farm land in Somerset, England. Brothers Richard, powerfully built and gross in actions, loves the land and follows in his father’s footsteps to continue the mundane existence while William has a frailer frame, interests, activities and ‘soul’ of an artist and is married with a daughter, but it becomes unraveled. The father, Herbie, is an enigmatic individual with traits somewhat unusual for a farmer and totally enchanted by his wife Madeline, a still quite refined and beautiful woman. Richard marries Selina, the town’s beautiful, sexy, but ‘loose’ woman, she becomes pregnant, aborts the baby and divorces to move to Europe. Richard remarries Anne and they have three children. Meanwhile, William has seen Selina and recognizes in her the perfect model and one with ‘an inner soul’ which he can equate, and having also moved to Europe to study art meets her there. The plot revolves around the triangle of the two brothers and Selina and their interaction as well as with a number of ancillary but relevant characters to move to a quite understandable termination.

Discussion: Unfortunately, a discussion of this book can only follow a conclusion which will provide a very distinctly dichotomous appeal. Pragmatists will believe they are reading a somewhat rambling and perhaps even confusingly unstructured story about jealousy, its activity and ensuing results within a family and their small town acquaintances. HOWEVER, the reader who will look more closely at the characters as they wend their way through the plot will discover a quite fascinating metaphysical presentation encompassing the total meaning of the word. Specifically: metaphysics is defined as “a division of philosophy that is concerned with the fundamental nature of reality and being” and that includes ontology which is defined as: “a branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature and relations of being or the kinds of things that have existence” – in other words ‘a study of what is outside of, or not usually observed in or during, objective experience’. As the reader witnesses the changing thought and action patterns of each character as he/she continues to mature with advancing time and experiences an entirely new picture evolves that is quite revealing.

Conclusion: Having read and enjoyed some of the author’s earlier books, this reviewer is fascinated at the new direction (growth?) the author has exhibited. A hint of this change appeared in The Mud Dance, but it has been most prominently exhibited in this volume. It indeed is unfortunate that there will be no more of this ‘new’ Neil Grimmett.

3*           5* captivating metaphysical novel; 3* regrettable caveat for more pragmatic readers.

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